Teachsafety

parent and teach safe kids

TELL ME ABOUT IT! Teaching Children the Art of Description

on March 23, 2012

I am always a teachers best friend when I start talking during a safety assembly about description, now this is something a teacher can sink their teeth into!

Parents- For those who have not started, one of the fundamental  foundations for your child’s  safety plan will be descriptors.

People – Teach your child to describe people, start with features, colors, size, male, female, hair, skin, age, clothing, etc……

It is fun to describe people you know well, while at the dinner table.  “Who can tell me what Grandpa loks like?”

While out and about, point out someone and have your child really look  at them, and ask them to use their describing vocabulary.

Later on, when they need to describe someone for any reason, they will have the confident vocabulary. (pgs 90-91) parent/teacher worksheets.

Describing Actions we are telling about- Who What Where When Why?  This is a fun game, use it before a movie begins,

then stop the movie discuss, and then afterward again.  You can use the same for stories you are reading.

Describing will become a habit, and if a child is ever asked to describe, in a situation where authorities really need to know specifics, your child  will be able to do it acurately.

I have groups of children walking home practice looking at license numbers, makes and models of cars…it is just one more way of getting children to use thier “Lighthouse Walk,” (page 46) and be present in the activity of being aware of their surroundings.

Start today, practice describing……if the never use it for safety reasons, great, and the teachers will love you!

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3 responses to “TELL ME ABOUT IT! Teaching Children the Art of Description

  1. Barbara @ Just Another Manic Mommy says:

    I am going to start doing this with my children tomorrow….thanks!

  2. Wow! Melinda, this is powerful!

    In relation to my involvement with Human Trafficking Education, Awareness and Prevention, this is “essential”. By the time a child grows into the teen years, where they are the most vulnerable to Human Trafficking, they will be well versed in the “descriptive” process.

    Parents start teaching your children young!

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